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Our most recent work explores the use of games and simulations in K-12 environments. The basic principals and cognitive rational for the use of this technology is first explained based on a new generation of “players” and students accustomed to dynamic learning. With the physical infrastructure of computer technology in place, simulations and games, become a viable source for training and development and are extremely valuable in the engagement of learners both as individual and collective interaction. Implications for both policy and classroom use of video games is explored. Practical considerations for repurposing COTS (Commercial off the shelf) games for P-12 will be explored with direct correlation to national standards in content areas.  

 

 
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Call of Duty PDF Print E-mail
Written by Yadi Zziaeehezarjeribi   
Saturday, 15 January 2011

Call of Duty Video Games (First Person Shooter)

Call of Duty (COD). Video game intended and rated for children ages thirteen and older.  According to Activision (2003), “Through the lens of a first person video game, players experience “epic” World War II European front battles as members of the United States military.  This video game has high quality cinema, authentic weaponry, with twenty four missions and four allied campaigns. Only the training portion of the game was used for this research. Avatar. This embodied identity or “in game character” allows players to experience a virtual environment through a first person perspective enhancing the experience. In many games players have the option of modifying the player characteristics which may change the outcome of the game. In Medal of Honor and Call of Duty, the Avatars have the ability to change and use weaponry, move through scenes, with a limited amount of movements and actions such as walking, climbing, crawling, throwing, and shooting. For instance, one of the “actions” needed to complete the training session was to set a timed explosive.

 

Last Updated ( Saturday, 03 March 2012 )
 
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